Psychic Mortician Avoids Skeptical Questioning

Mariah de la Croix, depending on where you look, bills herself as a psychic, medium, empath, and even a “sensitive intuitive.”  She claims to be able to communicate both with the spirits of humans and the “energies of the animal kingdom.”  For modest prices, she offers a variety of services, including, but not limited to:  astrological charts, past life therapy, tarot readings, and something called personal animal totems.  The slogan at LadyMariah.com is “Where answers are given…just not always the ones you want.”  Unfortunately, Mariah herself doesn’t seem to be willing to answer any of my questions at all.

It all started the week before Halloween when her publicist, Liz Donatelli, emailed myself and my co-host Bobby Nelson over at Strange Frequencies Radio.   She was requesting that we book her client for an interview to discuss her book, “Restless in Peace:  A Psychic Mortician’s Encounters with Those Who Refuse to Rest.”  In this paranormal memoir, it is revealed that Mariah de la Croix worked in several funeral homes as a mortician and embalmer and encountered a variety of spirits along the way.  For instance, Mariah relates a tale of a female spirit that left the confines of one mortuary to take up residence in her car for over a year.  Another spirit, who was apparently murdered outside the mortuary, returned annually to the scene of the crime to pursue justice.  Still other spirits Mariah met and communicated with were said to perform such mischievous acts as moving urns and hiding items on the roof of the mortuaries themselves.  And, yes, sometimes the dead assist in their own funeral proceedings.  Ms. de la Croix,  it seemed to us, would make a wonderful guest for our show.  We said yes and booked the date of November 4th with her publicist.

Mariah de la Croix (via: authors.com)

On the Amazon.com page for her book, I had been able to find out a couple names of the mortuaries she is said to have worked at.  I tried googling them but couldn’t find any precise matches in Arizona, where she resides, or anywhere else with an admittedly cursory search.  Because I didn’t have a physical copy of her book at the time, and her website didn’t provide much information, I wrote to Mariah personally to get a bit more background information on her story.  It’s not something that is altogether uncommon for me, and it has never posed a problem before to ask a few questions so I could gather a bit more interview material.  In the interest of full disclosure, here is the unedited text of the email I sent to Mariah:

Hi Mariah,

I was curious about some of the mortuaries you mentioned working at in your book.  Are they in the Phoenix area?  I was interested in checking them out.  Thanks so much!

Jason

Here was her response, also unedited:

Hi Jason,

Thank you so very much for your enquiry, but unfortunately, for legal reasons, plus the privacy of the establishments involved and the families they serve, I can’t give you their locations.  I’m sorry.  I would be able to chat with you about the book, though, if there is anything else you would like to ask.

Mariah

So, okay, fine.  She doesn’t want to give out the locations.  I was unaware that providing the cities or states they were in was a legal concern, particularly when in much of the biographical information of Mariah online, the Phoenix, AZ area is mentioned.  Judging by her response, the names of the mortuaries may very well be real.  But then why wasn’t I able to find them?  I decided to leave it at that and just ask any further questions to her personally during the interview.

Except, that ended up being canceled shortly thereafter.  We received an email from Liz Donatelli, the publicist, later that night to rescind approval for the interview.  Liz claimed that Mariah felt my email to her was “inappropriate” and had decided to cancel after listening to an archive episode of our show.
I was incredulous.  My email to her was in no way inappropriate.  And judging by her response, she didn’t think so at first either.  I began to suspect that Mariah checked out our show, saw we were skeptical, and backed out for fear of tough questioning.  At the time she canceled, the most recent archived episode involved us speaking about a recent psychic failure involving a missing child.  Could Mariah have seen this and decided to go into hiding?

At this point, it would seem so.  I tried emailing her again directly to express my confusion.  I explained that I have never had someone respond to an email query with a phrase like “thank you,” as well as an open-ended invitation for more questions, only to later determine my original communication was inappropriate.  I also asked Mariah to please tell me what about our show she suddenly found unfavorable.  I explained to her that, in the four years we have been doing Strange Frequencies Radio, we have never had anyone, from scientist or philosopher to ghost hunter or psychic, claim that we treated them unfairly.  I told her that, even in the cases where we disagree with our guests, the vast majority of the time we end up laughing and having a good time with them.  The point of Strange Frequencies Radio, I said, is conversation, not confrontation.  We only want the truth.  I hoped my email would calm any fears she may have and that she would reconsider.

Well, I can’t say that I anticipated getting a response.  I assumed by that time her publicist had already told her to avoid further communication from us.  As of this writing, now several days after sending that last email, she has not gotten back with me.

Later, after talking to a friend, I decided to run a search with the Arizona Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers to see if Mariah de la Croix was licensed in the state.  She’s not.  There is no listing for her as a funeral director, embalmer or cremationist.  She’s not even an intern.  My friend and I have both sent messages to her on Twitter on successive days since neither she or her publicist have been responding to emails.  I asked if she is using a pseudonym or is perhaps no longer licensed.  The latter wouldn’t be a good answer, however, since the Board lists both current and former licensees right on their website.  Anyone can access them, both to verify licensure or even to see whether or not the person in question has faced any disciplinary action related to their profession.  Unsurprisingly, she hasn’t responded.

As of now, it has gotten to the point where I think Mariah de la Croix is hiding something.  She may or may not be using a fictitious name for her psychic business and book, but then she won’t divulge any information regarding the whereabouts of the mortuaries she is said to have worked at either.  A quick phone call to verify her employment and spiritual encounters is all I would like to do.  But since I can’t find record of her even having a license to do the type of work she says she has done, I have no evidence by which to back up any of the claims she is making.

Is it all a misunderstanding that Mariah de la Croix refuses to help clear up?  If so, why?  Or, even worse, is her entire story built on a foundation of lies and misinformation?  Only Mariah has the answers to the questions I have been asking.  And it seems that, after all this time, neither her or the spirits are interested in talking.

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Psychic Mortician Avoids Skeptical Questioning

8 thoughts on “Psychic Mortician Avoids Skeptical Questioning

  1. It would be acceptable if she disclosed her legal name to you with the promise you wouldn’t share it, so that you could verify her claims. But then again, everyone would have to take YOU on your word so it wouldn’t do much good. I know in some states it’s illegal to work as one of those professions without a license, but if she is just saying she is without practicing, maybe she is not. Although I do know that in my particular line of work, if someone profits from stating they are board certified, even if it’s just to sell books (many child psychologists claim to be behaviorists when they write parenting books it’s very common), they can still face legal persecution. Even if she is truthful and is working under a pen name, which many people do these days, it would still be easy enough to clarify the facts. However, I highly doubt she is or ever was licensed, as “mortician” is an antiquated (sp?) term that those who hold a license don’t readily use, because in effect it’s not the right terminology.

  2. Steve Smith says:

    Until recently, I lived in Phoenix all my life. I am very familiar with most of the mortuaries and cemeteries, and even have relatives and friends in some them. The places are real. No doubt Ms De La Croix has used a pen name, it would be uhm…suicide, if she hadn’t. This however has no bearing on the truth, or lack of it in the book. What I am saying is that the settings she described are real, and she has a good reason for not using her name.

    1. Thanks, Steve. I don’t often check the comments here, as this is not my site. Maybe you can help. Can you provide phone numbers, addresses, or even just websites to the locations mentioned? I’d like to call them and verify some information. That’s all I ever wanted from “De la Croix.” Thanks again.

  3. Reyna says:

    So you’re saying you lived there and the mortuaries she disclosed working at are actual places in the town? have you talked to people that know of her? If its so small knit of a place she would have to use a pen name for everywhere else’s sake, you think the people that work/live in this town would know of her and her using a pen name?
    Why didnt she tell us she was using a pen name in the book?
    I was going to buy this book for serious consideration and now after reading this article I just feel really stupid and hoaxed.
    Blehhhhh.

    1. I can’t say what exactly the truth is, Reyna. De la Croix, as you can see, was very unhelpful in allowing me to verify any information. However, I do hope to contact the mortuaries in question soon and perhaps update the article.

  4. Jeannie Blue Eyes says:

    I’ve been reading her book but have decided to bail out on page 60. The book smacks of fiction, pure and simple. (And I do believe in the paranormal.) Feels like an abysmal fake. God forgive me if I’m wrong, but I don’t think Ms. de la Croix knows much about the supernatural, which would be necessary in order to make it convincing.

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